Jordan Anderson’s legendary clapback

Jordan Anderson’s legendary clapback

In 1825, at the approximate age of eight, Jordan Anderson (sometimes spelled “Jordon”) was sold into slavery and would live as a servant of the Anderson family for 39 years. In 1864, the Union Army camped out on the Anderson plantation and he and his wife, Amanda, were liberated. The couple eventually made it safely to Dayton, Ohio when, in July 1865, Jordan received a letter from his former owner, Colonel P.H. Anderson. The letter kindly asked Jordan to return to work on the plantation because it had fallen into disarray during the war.

On August 7, 1865, Jordan dictated his response through his new boss, Valentine Winters, and it was published in the Cincinnati Commercial. The letter entitled “Letter from a Freedman to His Old Master” was not only hilarious, but it showed compassion, defiance and dignity. That year, the the letter would be republished in the New York Daily Tribune and Lydia Marie Child’s The Freedman’s Book.

The letter mentions a “Miss Mary” (Col. Anderson’s Wife), “Martha” (Col. Anderson’s daughter), Henry (most likely Col. Anderson’s son), and George Carter (a local carpenter).  Read more 

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